The Classical Conspiracy

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17/20
Band Name Epica (NL)
Album Name The Classical Conspiracy
Type Live
Дата релиза 08 Май 2009
Лейблы Nuclear Blast
Музыкальный стильSymphonic Metal
Владельцы этого альбома277

Tracklist

CLASSICAL SET
1.
 Palladium
 03:46
2.
 Dies Irea (Verdi)
 02:15
3.
 Ombra Mai Fu (Händel)
 03:06
4.
 Adagio (Dvorák)
 09:02
5.
 Spider-Man Medley
 04:16
6.
 Presto (Vivaldi)
 03:06
7.
 Montagues and Capulets (Prokofiev)
 02:11
8.
 The Imperial March (J. Williams)
 03:25
9.
 Stabat Mater Dolorosa (Pergolesi)
 04:31
10.
 Unholy Trinity
 03:11
11.
 In the Hall of the Mountain King (Grieg)
 03:11
12.
 Pirates of the Caribbean Medley
 06:44
13.
 Indigo
 02:04
14.
 The Last Crusade
 04:18
15.
 Sensorium
 05:06
16.
 Quietus
 04:22
17.
 Chasing the Dragon
 08:03
18.
 Feint
 04:34

Total playing time: 01:17:11



EPICA SET
1.
 Never Enough
 05:37
2.
 Beyond Belief
 05:28
3.
 Cry for the Moon
 07:44
4.
 Safeguard to Paradise
 03:59
5.
 Blank Infinity
 04:45
6.
 Living a Lie
 05:24
7.
 The Phantom Agony
 10:30
8.
 Sancta Terra
 05:11
9.
 Illusive Consensus
 05:45
10.
 Consign to Oblivion
 12:06

Total playing time: 01:06:29



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Обзор @ Vinrock666

24 Март 2010
In 2009, Epica released a 2 CD live album called “The Classical Conspiracy”. Part Two of this review covers the second CD.

The second CD from Epica’s 2009 live album “The Classical Conspiracy” is aptly subtitled ‘The Epica Set’ because all of the songs are from past Epica albums. Beyond the compositional and technical brilliance of the music as it is written and played lies this recording’s greatest characteristic and that is the high quality of this production. It is simply magnificent. When you consider the sheer output that the band, orchestra, and choir combined delivers it must be noted above all else that not only was their total sound wonderfully captured but leveled in such a way that no contribution ever sounds muffled, smothered, or disproportionate. The electric power of the band does not drown out the orchestra and the choir doesn’t take away from lead singer Simone Simons, and so on and so forth. The result of this amazing capture of sound makes what is already an incredible body of work an all the more pleasurable experience.

Technical details of the live production aside, a big reason for this project’s success comes from the compositional structure of the songs themselves. Epica’s music by definition is orchestra and symphonic by design. The magic, therefore, of this project does not come from added parts allotted to the orchestra to provide a more ample contribution, but rather the substitution of what originally was the synthesizer parts for the orchestra to take over. The result is that these songs never, ever deviate from their original designs, nor are they new versions, either. They are enhanced, more organic, and more alive. Synthesized parts are now authentic. Keyboardist Coen Janssen plays piano (“Safeguard to Paradise”) for example. In general, with the symphony there is added power (“Blank Infinity”), depth (“The Phantom Agony”, “Sancta Terra”) and diversity (check out the glockenspiel in the verse line on “Beyond Belief” for instance. Little nuggets of added flavor like this are found everywhere).

As is the philosophical standard for Epica, the metallic personality of the band is well represented (“Consign to Oblivion”, especially with its explosive entrance) and out in front on all of the tracks. Percussion-wise and bass-wise, their low end sound reverberates with palpitating force (“Never Enough”, “Beyond Belief”, and “Black Infinity” to name a few) and is just an awesome backbone for every other tone and register that plays. Elsewhere, the choir is beautiful with slightly altered arrangements to maximize the new number of voices, as opposed to the single digit contributors on the original recordings, and lastly, the crowd is into it as well. An intimate setting, they are quite lively and heavily involved. There is one person that hoots just a little too much over one ill-placed microphone, but don’t lock into that. It’s a speck of imperfection on an otherwise perfect record.

The idea of a live orchestra combining with a heavy metal band for a night has been done before and more often than one might believe, but Epica’s “The Classical Conspiracy” should be considered among the best ever. At the very least, it is one of the most wonderful live musical experiences to have come out in 2009.

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Обзор @ Vinrock666

11 Февраль 2014

"...a perfect heavy metal album."

In 2009, Epica released a 2 CD live album called “The Classical Conspiracy”. Part One of this review covers the first CD.

It must be stated first and foremost that Epica’s “The Classical Conspiracy” is a perfect heavy metal album. This project illustrates better than anything else previously released the connection, both in influence as well as lineage, between classical and heavy metal music, especially when it comes to the European bands, of which Epica is a proud member. From a creative standpoint, multiple ideas are expertly realized. From a playing standpoint, the execution is flawless, brilliant, and awesome.

What “The Classical Conspiracy” is exactly needs to be further explored. First off, the first CD could have been divided into two parts. The set opens with classical and modern scores with a couple arias. The arias, which are very beautiful, are included for the sake of including lead female vocalist Simone Simons. She is a rising star in metal and part of that is due to her all-world level operatic singing ability. The other songs are instrumental save for the choir parts brought to us by the Choir of Miskolc National Theatre. These other selections feature a few wonderful surprises. Two of the tracks, “Palladium” and “Unholy Trinity” are in fact new compositions written by band member Yves Huts. They are so well written that they blend in perfectly with tracks from the very best, including Handel and Vivaldi. The other surprises are scores from contemporary composers Danny Elfman and John Williams. By putting all of these tracks together, the result is a seamless symmetry of symphony and metal. They are truly one and the same. The best example of this is Williams’ “The Imperial March” from “The Empire Strikes Back”. Any metal fan familiar with this score will attest that this was metal way before Epica made it so. All of these tracks leave that impression as well.

What is great about the second part is feeling the immediate impact of classical influence on the selected Epica songs, especially the spine-tingling first song “Indigo”. It also serves as an introduction to the opening metal riff of the next track “The Last Crusade”, which further illuminates the two genre’s dichotomy. “Sensorium” is probably the most overtly metal song due mostly to the contributing death vocal lines of male singer Mark Jansen.

The band Epica has been a rising force of symphonic/gothic metal for some time now, but on “The Classical Conspiracy” the duality of their sound is the primary focus here.. Accolades must also be given to the Extended Remenyi Ede Chamber Orchestra for their most impressive contribution. Simply put, part one of “The Classical Conspiracy” is magnificent and one of the very best CDs to come out in 2009.

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Комментарий @ yellosfr

05 Июнь 2009
Finally after two year of waiting time there is something new for Epica! But it is not really new...It is a Live album with the symphonic orchestra and choir in the Miskolc International Opera Festival, in Hungary. I was a bit afraid because the concept of playing with a symphonic orchestra never work so well with metal bands. (I am thinking about Therion and co...) But I should keep my prejudices out for Epica, which is still one of the best creative bands these few years. Moreover S&M of Metallica with Michael Kamen is one of my favorite albums.
My first impression was according the bad recordings found on internet. I was very disappointed by them and decided to wait the official recording version of Epica playing with the orchestra and choir.
When I got finally the opportunity to listen to the final version I have been positively impressed by the quality of the production and sound. However the choice of the songs was quite surprising. It is in two part. First part is some classical or movie music arranged by Epica to match Epica`s music (cf Symphonic Metal). This choice is particularly dangerous, because some music sounds perfectly good without any arrangement. I think Epica succeeded quite well this difficult challenge even if it is strange to have “The Imperial March” close to “Stabat Master Dolorosa”. It is at this stage of the album that the beautiful singer Simone Simons appears for the first time. We can regret that she did not sing more in the first part. I think sometimes that the symphonic music during this live on this album is a bit flat compared to the original symphonic music and that the drums are too much present and strong. The second part is whatsoever a normal Live show of Epica, even if there is an orchestra and choir which is hardly noticeable (and still a bit flat).
Globally this album is good and it is a real pleasure to listen to. Perhaps it was for them the good choice to adapt some existing classical songs and not to adapt too much their own songs.
7/10


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